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Training entitled “GHG emission measuring techniques, mitigations and adaptations strategies in livestock in the climate change scenario”

Training entitled “GHG emission measuring techniques, mitigations and adaptations strategies in livestock in the climate change scenario” was held from March 22-23, 2019 at the Africa Center of Excellence for Climate Smart Agriculture and Biodiversity Conservation (ACE Climate SABC) in Haramaya University, which is organized in collaboration with Ethiopian Biotechnology Institute.
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Following the introduction of the objectives of the training by Dr Yesihak Yusuf, Welcome and opening speech was made by Dr. Nigussie Dechassa, Vice president of Haramaya University. He warmly welcomed all the participants to the Training.
Dr. Nigussie Dechassa, in his welcoming remark, quoting the objective of the UN-Climate Change Convention (UNFCCC) , mentioning that the ultimate objectives of the Climate Change Convention (UNFCCC) is  to achieve "... stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system." And he said, estimating the levels of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions and removal is an important element of the efforts to achieve this objective.
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Mr Chernet Woyimo, Researcher at Ethiopian Biotechnology Institute, has presented topics related to basics of methane production and emission, CH4 emission and Mitigation research activities in Ethiopia & showed the students and participants’ possible GHG research themes. Mr Chernet on his scientific topic presentation briefly presents the most common methods for estimating and measuring methane emissions from ruminants, including newly developed techniques. The focus is on methods at the individual animal scale. He presented each methods, advantages and disadvantages emphasized.
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Mr Chernet, furthermore, presented and shared his amazing experiences from New Zeeland on principles, advantages and disadvantages of different methods used to quantify the enteric methane emission from ruminants. He addresses the best-known methods: Chambers/respiration chambers, SF6 technique and in vitro gas production technique. Model estimations, which are used to calculate national budget and single cow enteric emission from intake and diet composition, are also explained.
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 He was more specifically focused on measuring Methane by means of Chamber and Chambers development/construction/ Scenarios. During his chambers development presentations mentioned that the principle of the chambers is to collect all exhaled breath from the animal and measure the methane concentration and Methane loss is an inherent part of the energy metabolism in ruminants as well as explains various types of chambers that are valuable tools in the investigation of mitigation strategies for methane emissions and he said there is no doubt that this system gives quantitative measurements of methane emission more accurately but establishment costs of the system restricts the number of animals.
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In his conclusion, Mr. Chernet said, many good methods for measuring and estimating methane emissions from ruminants are already in use and new ones are being developed. None of them are however flawless and they all require careful consideration before application. In this context a thorough knowledge of the advantages and disadvantages of experimental methods is extremely important, both when planning experiments and when interpreting own results, he said.
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Dr. Belete Shenkute, from Arsi University presented two very interesting topics on ruminal microbes and Methane production as well as enteric methane production and applicable mitigation strategy under Ethiopian condition. 
Dr. Belete, explained ruminants are the principal source of livestock methane emissions because they produce the most methane per unit of feed

Haneek, [25.03.19 22:52]
sumed. Ruminant livestock (cattle, sheep, buffalo, goats, deer and camels) have a fore-stomach (or rumen) containing microbes called methanogens, which are capable of digesting coarse plant material and which produce methane as a by-product of digestion (enteric fermentation), which is later released by the animal through belching. He also mentioned that how we can reduce livestock greenhouse gas emissions these are approaches to mitigating livestock greenhouse gas emissions: husbandry (animal breeding, feed supplements, improved pastures) management systems (stocking rates, biological control) numbers of livestock manure management. 
Dr Yishak Yusuf, from Haramaya University also gave talk on mitigation of ruminant methane production: current strategies, constraints and future options.
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Besides certain successes at the center the main challenges such as limited laboratory resource and lack of techniques of CH4 measurement IVGP and methane Chamber faced the centers are discussed against by the participants. To establish and install this methane chamber at Africa Center of Excellence for Climate Smart Agriculture and Biodiversity Conservation (ACE Climate SABC) , at haramaya university it cost the amount of 143,000$, but, Mr Chernet, he underscored and forward all the possible ways and solutions for the construction /installation/ of methane chamber at Haramaya University.
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It is noticed that Participants from Regional and national postgraduate students , PHD students, faculty working on
 areas related to Climate Smart Livestock Production and Management, researchers, senior expertise from Universities are participated in the training. Finally the training was concluded by providing certificate for participants.